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Bernardsville, New Jersey

 
 
Bernardsville, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Bernardsville
Cows grazing at a farm in Bernardsville
Map of Bernardsville in Somerset County. Inset: Location of Somerset County in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Bernardsville, New Jersey.
Coordinates: 40.730387°N 74.592571°WCoordinates40.730387°N 74.592571°W[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Somerset
Incorporated April 29, 1924
Government[6]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Lee C. Honecker (term ends December 31, 2013)[3]
 • Administrator Ralph A. Maresca, Jr.[4]
 • Clerk Sandra G. Jones[5]
Area[2]
 • Total 12.980 sq mi (33.619 km2)
 • Land 12.905 sq mi (33.425 km2)
 • Water 0.075 sq mi (0.194 km2)  0.58%
Area rank 184th of 566 in state
9th of 21 in county[2]
Elevation[7] 682 ft (208 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 7,707
 • Estimate (2012[11]) 7,755
 • Rank 296th of 566 in state
13th of 21 in county[12]
 • Density 597.2/sq mi (230.6/km2)
 • Density rank 428th of 566 in state
17th of 21 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07924[13][14]
Area code(s) 908
FIPS code 3403505590[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID 0885159[17][2]
Website www.bernardsvilleboro.org

Bernardsville /ˈbɜrnərdzvɪl/ is a borough inSomerset CountyNew Jersey, United States. In 2000 Bernardsville had the 10th-highest per capita income in the state[18]and ranked 76th nationally among the 100 highest-income places in the United States (with at least 1,000 households).[citation needed] As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 7,707,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 362 (+4.9%) from the 7,345 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 748 (+11.3%) from the 6,597 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

Bernardsville was incorporated as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 6, 1924, from portions of Bernards Township, based on the results of a referendum held on April 29, 1924.[20]

Part of the borough was listed on theNational Register of Historic Places asOlcott Avenue Historic District in 2009.[21]

 

History[edit]

Bernardsville was originally a section ofBernards Township known as Vealtown.[22]In 1840, Vealtown became Bernardsville, named after Sir Francis Bernard, Colonialgovernor of New Jersey from 1758 to 1760.[23] Located in the northernmost part of Somerset County, just 12 miles (19 km) south of Morristown, the borough includes some of the last vestiges of the Great Eastern Forest.[24]

During the Revolutionary War, GeneralCharles Lee rested his troops in Vealtown around the night of December 12 to 13, 1776. General Lee and some of his guard spent the night about 3 miles (5 km) southeast at White's Inn on the southeast side of Basking Ridge, near the manor house of Continental Army general William Alexander, Lord Stirling. On the morning of December 13, General Lee was captured by the British and removed to New York.[25]

After the Civil War, many wealthy and prominent New Yorkers moved into the area, first as summer visitors, then as permanent residents of the Bernardsville Mountain.

The Gladstone Branch railroad line was built through Bernardsville in 1872 and played an important role in the borough's development. Bernardsville did not become an independent municipality until 1924, when it split from Bernards Township.[20]

Olcott Avenue Historic District, above Olcott Center The New Jersey State Review Board for Historic Sites recommended the creation of the Olcott Avenue historic district on February 10, 2009. While the Olcott Avenue School is but one historic structure within Bernardsville's first historic district area, the area's appeal and historic significance is part of the story of the rise of the middle class in Bernardsville and how this particular location impacted the entire region, from the downtown, Little Italy, and the Mountain Colony areas.[26]

Geography[edit]

Bernardsville is located at 40°43′49″N 74°35′33″W (40.730387,-74.592571). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 12.980 square miles (33.619 km2), of which, 12.905 square miles (33.425 km2) of it is land and 0.075 square miles (0.194 km2) of it (0.58%) is water.[1][2]

Demographics[edit]

Historical populations
Census Pop.  
1930 3,336  
1940 3,405   2.1%
1950 3,956   16.2%
1960 5,515   39.4%
1970 6,652   20.6%
1980 6,715   0.9%
1990 6,597   −1.8%
2000 7,345   11.3%
2010 7,707   4.9%
Est. 2012 7,755 [11] 0.6%
Population sources:1930[27]
1930-1990[28] 2000[29][30] 2010[8][9][10]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 7,707 people, 2,685 households, and 2,086 families residing in the borough. Thepopulation density was 597.2 inhabitants per square mile (230.6 /km2). There were 2,871 housing units at an average density of 222.5 per square mile (85.9 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 91.38% (7,043) White, 0.88% (68) Black or African American, 0.14% (11) Native American, 3.27% (252) Asian, 0.06% (5) Pacific Islander, 2.18% (168) from other races, and 2.08% (160) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 11.72% (903) of the population.[8]

There were 2,685 households of which 40.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.2% were married couples living together, 7.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.3% were non-families. 19.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.87 and the average family size was 3.27.[8]

In the borough, 28.6% of the population were under the age of 18, 5.5% from 18 to 24, 22.7% from 25 to 44, 31.0% from 45 to 64, and 12.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.1 years. For every 100 females there were 98.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.3 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $128,333 (with a margin of error of +/- $12,233) and the median family income was $141,510 (+/- $17,179). Males had a median income of $87,500 (+/- $36,816) versus $73,250 (+/- $10,725) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $70,141 (+/- $9,890). About 1.9% of families and 2.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.2% of those under age 18 and 5.2% of those age 65 or over.[31]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 7,345 people, 2,723 households, and 2,050 families residing in the borough. The population density was 568.1 people per square mile (219.3/km2). There were 2,807 housing units at an average density of 217.1 per square mile (83.8/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 93.94% White, 0.25% African American, 0.15%Native American, 2.64% Asian, 1.55% from other races, and 1.47% from two or more races.Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.98% of the population.[29][30]

There were 2,723 households out of which 35.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.2% were married couples living together, 6.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.7% were non-families. 21.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.69 and the average family size was 3.12.[29][30]

In the borough the population was spread out with 26.1% under the age of 18, 4.5% from 18 to 24, 28.7% from 25 to 44, 28.0% from 45 to 64, and 12.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 96.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.3 males.[29][30]

The median income for a household in the borough was $104,162, and the median income for a family was $126,601. Males had a median income of $91,842 versus $50,732 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $69,854. About 1.6% of families and 2.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.3% of those under age 18 and 2.5% of those age 65 or over.[29][30]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

A train at the Bernardsville Station

Bernardsville is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The government consists of a Mayor and a six-member Borough Council, with all positions elected on an at-large basis in partisan elections. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year.[6]

As of 2013, the Mayor of Bernardsville is Lee C. Honecker (R, term ends December 31, 2014).[32]Members of the Borough Council are Council President Kevin Sooy (R, 2013), Jeffrey J. DeLeo (R, 2015), Michael dePoortere (R, 2015), John F. Farrell (R, 2014), Craig Lawrence (R, 2013) and Joseph C. Rossi (R, 2014).[33][34][35][36]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Bernardsville is located in the 7th Congressional District[37] and is part of New Jersey's 25th state legislative district.[9][38][39] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Bernardsville had been in the 16th state legislative district.[40]

New Jersey's Seventh Congressional District is represented by Leonard Lance (RClinton Township).[41] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (DNewark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[42][43] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[44][45]

The 25th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate byAnthony Bucco (RBoonton) and in the General Assembly by Tony Bucco (R, Boonton Township) and Michael Patrick Carroll (R, Morris Township).[46] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie(RMendham Township).[47] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R,Monmouth Beach).[48]

Somerset County is governed by a five-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, whose members are elected at-large to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one or two seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects a Director and Deputy Director from among its members.[49] As of 2013, Somerset County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Peter S. Palmer (RBernardsville, term ends December 31, 2014),[50] Freeholder Deputy Director Patrick Scaglione (R, Bridgewater Township, 2015).[51] Mark Caliguire (R, Skillman in Montgomery Township, 2015),[52] Patricia L. Walsh (R,Green Brook Township, 2013),[53] and Robert Zaborowski (R, Somerset in Franklin Township, 2014),[54][55][56] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Brett A. Radi (R, Somerville, 2017),[57] Sheriff Frank J. Provenzano (R, Raritan, 2013)[58][59] and Surrogate Frank Bruno (R, Branchburg, 2015).[60]

Politics[edit]

An elegant restaurant in Bernardsville

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 5,341 registered voters in Bernardsville, of which 955 (17.9% vs. 26.0% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 2,472 (46.3% vs. 25.7%) were registered asRepublicans and 1,913 (35.8% vs. 48.2%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There was one voter registered to another party.[61] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 69.3% (vs. 60.4% in Somerset County) were registered to vote, including 97.1% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 80.4% countywide).[61][62]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 2,295 votes here (55.8% vs. 46.1% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 1,753 votes (42.6% vs. 52.1%) and other candidates with 41 votes (1.0% vs. 1.1%), among the 4,113 ballots cast by the borough's 5,208 registered voters, for a turnout of 79.0% (vs. 78.7% in Somerset County).[63] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bushreceived 2,495 votes here (61.0% vs. 51.5% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 1,543 votes (37.7% vs. 47.2%) and other candidates with 37 votes (0.9% vs. 0.9%), among the 4,093 ballots cast by the borough's 4,909 registered voters, for a turnout of 83.4% (vs. 81.7% in the whole county).[64]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 1,867 votes here (60.2% vs. 55.8% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 747 votes (24.1% vs. 34.1%), Independent Chris Daggett with 463 votes (14.9% vs. 8.7%) and other candidates with 13 votes (0.4% vs. 0.7%), among the 3,099 ballots cast by the borough's 5,304 registered voters, yielding a 58.4% turnout (vs. 52.5% in the county).[65]

Education[edit]

Public school students in grades PreK–12 attend the schools of the Somerset Hills Regional School District, a regional school district serving students from Bernardsville, Far Hills andPeapack-Gladstone, along with students from Bedminster who are sent to the district's high school as part of a sending/receiving relationship.[66] As of the 2010-11 school year, the district's three schools had an enrollment of 1,858 students and 156.6 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.86:1.[67]

The three schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[68]) are Bedwell Elementary School[69] (PreK–4, 689 students), Bernardsville Middle School[70] (5–8, 577) and Bernards High School[71] (9–12, 795), all of which are located in Bernardsville.[72]

Notable people[edit]

Notable current and former residents of Bernardsville include:



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