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Bedminster, New Jersey


 
 
Bedminster, New Jersey
Township
Township of Bedminster
Map of Bedminster Township in Somerset County. Inset: Location of Somerset County in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Bedminster Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40.673089°N 74.686325°WCoordinates40.673089°N 74.686325°W[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Somerset
Royal charter April 4, 1749
Incorporated February 21, 1798
Named for Bedminster, Bristol
Government[5]
 • Type Township
 • Mayor Steven E. Parker (term ends December 31, 2013)[3]
 • Administrator /Clerk Judith A. Sullivan[4]
Area[2]
 • Total 26.301 sq mi (68.119 km2)
 • Land 26.080 sq mi (67.547 km2)
 • Water 0.221 sq mi (0.573 km2)  0.84%
Area rank 100th of 566 in state
5th of 21 in county[2]
Elevation[6] 141 ft (43 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 8,165
 • Estimate (2012[10]) 8,204
 • Rank 283rd of 566 in state
12th of 21 in county[11]
 • Density 313.1/sq mi (120.9/km2)
 • Density rank 476th of 566 in state
20th of 21 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07921[12][13]
Area code(s) 908[14]
FIPS code 3403504450[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID 0882176[17][2]
Website www.bedminster.us

Bedminster is a township in Somerset County,New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 8,165,[7][8][9] reflecting a decline of 137 (-1.7%) from the 8,302 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 1,216 (+17.2%) from the 7,086 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]

Bedminster was settled in 1710 by Dutch, Germans, and Scots-Irish immigrants. It was named after Bedminster, then in Somerset, England and now a suburb of Bristol.[19]Bedminster Township was created by Royal charter on April 4, 1749, from portions of theNorthern precinct. It was incorporated formally by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798. Portions of the township were taken on March 28, 1912, to form Peapack-Gladstone.[20]The community of Pluckemin is part of the township as is part of Pottersville, which is split between Bedminster and Tewksbury Township inHunterdon county. It is bordered on the north byChester Township and on the northeast by Peapack-Gladstone.

Bedminster was the corporate headquarters ofAT&T Corporation, prior to its merger with SBC Communications (the combined company is now known as AT&T Inc.).[21] AT&T's Global Network Operations Center, which monitors traffic worldwide on AT&T's network, is currently located in Bedminister.[22] It was also the corporate headquarters for Verizon Wireless before it was relocated to nearby Basking Ridge in 2006.

Bedminster Township is noted for having one of the most historic revolutionary war sites in the United States at what is known as the Pluckemin Continental Artillery Cantonment Site, which has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places. General Henry Knox, chief of theContinental Army artillery, was the leader responsible for building what was the country's first military artillery training academy, the forerunner to United States Military Academy at West Point.[23]

 


 

Geography[edit]

Bedminster Township is located at 40°40′23″N 74°41′11″W (40.673089,-74.686325). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 26.301 square miles (68.119 km2), of which, 26.080 square miles (67.547 km2) of it was land and 0.221 square miles (0.573 km2) of it (0.84%) was water.[2][1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical populations
Census Pop.  
1790 1,197  
1810 1,312  
1820 1,393   6.2%
1830 1,453   4.3%
1840 1,589   9.4%
1850 1,826   14.9%
1860 1,996   9.3%
1870 1,881   −5.8%
1880 1,813   −3.6%
1890 1,749   −3.5%
1900 1,925   10.1%
1910 2,375   23.4%
1920 1,088 * −54.2%
1930 1,374   26.3%
1940 1,606   16.9%
1950 1,613   0.4%
1960 2,322   44.0%
1970 2,597   11.8%
1980 2,469   −4.9%
1990 7,086   187.0%
2000 8,302   17.2%
2010 8,165   −1.7%
Est. 2012 8,204 [10] 0.5%
Population sources:
1790-1920[24] 1840[25] 1850-1870[26]
1850[27] 1870[28] 1880-1890[29]
1890-1910[30] 1910-1930[31]
1930-1990[32] 2000[33][34] 2010[7][8][9]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[20]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 8,165 people, 4,100 households, and 2,021 families residing in the township. The population density was 313.1 inhabitants per square mile (120.9 /km2). There were 4,349 housing units at an average density of 166.8 per square mile (64.4 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 86.41% (7,055) White, 2.06% (168) Black or African American, 0.02% (2) Native American, 8.68% (709)Asian, 0.01% (1) Pacific Islander, 1.03% (84) from other races, and 1.79% (146) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.36% (519) of the population.[7]

There were 4,100 households of which 19.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 39.0% were married couples living together, 7.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 50.7% were non-families. 44.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 1.97 and the average family size was 2.76.[7]

In the township, 17.7% of the population were under the age of 18, 4.6% from 18 to 24, 30.5% from 25 to 44, 33.2% from 45 to 64, and 14.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.3 years. For every 100 females there were 80.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 79.5 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Surveyshowed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $93,103 (with a margin of error of +/- $11,367) and the median family income was $124,057 (+/- $14,892). Males had a median income of $76,047 (+/- $23,293) versus $61,650 (+/- $7,236) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $66,422 (+/- $8,900). About 0.9% of families and 2.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.4% of those under age 18 and 2.9% of those age 65 or over.[35]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 8,302 people, 4,235 households, and 2,100 families residing in the township. The population density was 313.6 people per square mile (121.1/km²). There were 4,467 housing units at an average density of 168.7 per square mile (65.2/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 90.05% White, 1.75% African American, 0.11%Native American, 6.41% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.83% from other races, and 0.83% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.84% of the population.[33][34]

There were 4,235 households out of which 20.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 40.8% were married couples living together, 6.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 50.4% were non-families. 44.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 1.96 and the average family size was 2.76.[33][34]

In the township the population was spread out with 17.8% under the age of 18, 3.8% from 18 to 24, 40.3% from 25 to 44, 27.3% from 45 to 64, and 10.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 85.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 82.1 males.[33][34]

The median income for a household in the township was $71,550, and the median income for a family was $96,890. Males had a median income of $71,136 versus $48,589 for females. The per capita income for the township was $53,549. About 1.9% of families and 3.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.3% of those under age 18 and 3.8% of those age 65 or over.[33][34]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Bedminster Township is governed under the Township form of government with a five-member Township Committee. The Township Committee is elected directly by the voters at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election.[5] At an annual reorganization meeting held during the first week of January, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as mayor.[36]

As of 2013, members of the Bedminster Township Committee are Mayor Steven E. Parker (R, term as mayor ends December 31, 2013,; term on township committee ends in 2015), Carolyn Freeman (D, 2014), Lawrence F. Jacobs (R, 2015), Bernie Pane (R, 2013) and Katy Rupert (R, 2013).[37][38][39][40]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Bedminster Township is located in the 7th Congressional District[41] and is part of New Jersey's 23rd state legislative district.[8][42][43] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Bedminster Township had been in the 16th state legislative district.[44]

New Jersey's Seventh Congressional District is represented by Leonard Lance (RClinton Township).[45] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (DNewark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[46][47] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[48][49]

The 23rd Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate byMichael J. Doherty (RWashington Township, Warren County) and in the General Assembly byJohn DiMaio (R, Hackettstown) and Erik Peterson (R, Franklin Township, Hunterdon County).[50]The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (RMendham Township).[51] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[52]

Somerset County is governed by a five-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, whose members are elected at-large to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one or two seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects a Director and Deputy Director from among its members.[53] As of 2013, Somerset County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Peter S. Palmer (RBernardsville, term ends December 31, 2014),[54] Freeholder Deputy Director Patrick Scaglione (R, Bridgewater Township, 2015).[55] Mark Caliguire (R, Skillman in Montgomery Township, 2015),[56] Patricia L. Walsh (R,Green Brook Township, 2013),[57] and Robert Zaborowski (R, Somerset in Franklin Township, 2014),[58][59][60] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Brett A. Radi (R, Somerville, 2017),[61] Sheriff Frank J. Provenzano (R, Raritan, 2013)[62][63] and Surrogate Frank Bruno (R, Branchburg, 2015).[64]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 6,183 registered voters in Bedminster Township, of which 1,258 (20.3% vs. 26.0% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 2,238 (36.2% vs. 25.7%) were registered as Republicans and 2,683 (43.4% vs. 48.2%) were registered asUnaffiliated. There were 4 voters registered to other parties.[65] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 75.7% (vs. 60.4% in Somerset County) were registered to vote, including 92.0% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 80.4% countywide).[65][66]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 2,431 votes here (51.7% vs. 46.1% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 2,203 votes (46.9% vs. 52.1%) and other candidates with 44 votes (0.9% vs. 1.1%), among the 4,702 ballots cast by the township's 6,102 registered voters, for a turnout of 77.1% (vs. 78.7% in Somerset County).[67] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 2,674 votes here (59.0% vs. 51.5% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 1,798 votes (39.7% vs. 47.2%) and other candidates with 42 votes (0.9% vs. 0.9%), among the 4,529 ballots cast by the township's 5,736 registered voters, for a turnout of 79.0% (vs. 81.7% in the whole county).[68]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 1,977 votes here (61.2% vs. 55.8% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 928 votes (28.7% vs. 34.1%), Independent Chris Daggett with 280 votes (8.7% vs. 8.7%) and other candidates with 26 votes (0.8% vs. 0.7%), among the 3,228 ballots cast by the township's 6,266 registered voters, yielding a 51.5% turnout (vs. 52.5% in the county).[69]

Education[edit]

The Bedminster Township School District serves students in pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade. As of the 2010-11 school year, Bedminster Township Public School had an enrollment of 590 students.[70]

Public school students in ninth through twelfth grades attend Bernards High School, as part of asending/receiving relationship with the Somerset Hills Regional School District, a K - 12 district serving students from BernardsvilleFar Hills and Peapack-Gladstone.[71]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

The township had a total of 68.04 miles (109.50 km) of roadways, of which 38.67 miles (62.23 km) are maintained by the municipality, 16.01 miles (25.77 km) by Somerset County and 13.36 miles (21.50 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[72]

Bedminster is traversed by Interstate 287, which runs through the eastern section, while Interstate 78 runs mostly through the center of the township. U.S. Route 202 and U.S. Route 206 also pass through running parallel to I-287 from the Bridgewater area to Pluckemin.

Major county roads that pass through include CR 512 and CR 523.

Public transportation[edit]

The closest New Jersey Transit service offered is at the Far Hills station on the Morris & Essex Lines.[73]

Points of interest[edit]

  • Natirar - estate spanning Peapack-Gladstone, Far Hills, and Bedminster that was sold byHassan II of Morocco to Somerset County and is now administered by the Somerset County Park Commission, with 40 acres (16 ha) of the estate's 404 acres (163.5 ha) located in the township.[74]
  • Historic Vanderveer-Knox House & Museum - a refurbished home used by General Henry Knox during the Revolutionary War with its earliest portions dating to the 1770s, the house was purchased by the township in 1989, and listed on the New Jersey and National Register of Historic Places in 1995.[75]
  • Trump National Golf Course - owned by Donald Trump, the course features 36 holes designed by Tom Fazio, with fees to join of $350,000.[76]
  • Pluckemin Continental Artillery Cantonment Site, also known as the Continental Artillery Military Cantonment Historic Site or Pluckemin Artillery Park, it was where General Henry Knox created America's first artillery training academy during the winter of 1778-1779, known as the "precursor to the United States Military Academy" at West Point.[23]
  • Donald Trump has proposed a 1.5 acres (0.61 ha), 500-grave cemetery to be located next to the Trump National Golf Course, with plots sold for upwards of $20,000.[77]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Bedminster Township include:



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